Eclipse Freshman Project #8: Riena

Riena is number 8 in my series of project that are new to the release train.  Christian Campo is the Riena project leader.

What does your project do?

Riena is a platform for developing multi-tier rich client applications based on the Eclipse Rich Client Platform (RCP) and Equinox.  Core to Riena is an OSGi-based Remote Services component that allows developers to easily create distributed client/server applications.  Furthermore Riena provides an enhanced navigation concept for business applications with a focus on end-user usability.

Riena is also part of the EclipseRT top level project which brings various runtime related efforts and technologies at Eclipse together.

Who are your typical users

Typical users of Riena are companies which are interested in realizing complex enterprise applications and by doing so, attach great importance to a high usability of their applications.

Why did you join the Galileo release train?

We’ve joined the Galileo release train to provide users and adopters of Riena a release which is coordinated with the 32 other Eclipse projects of Galileo. This will make it even simpler to use Riena with other major Eclipse projects as it is today.

Furthermore we’re participating in the Galileo release train in order to help to illustrate the ongoing improvement of the EclipseRT project providing an integrated, modular runtime platform for business applications.

After completing your first release train, what do you think now?

We’re proud to be part of the largest ever Eclipse release. This Riena release does not only include many new components, Eclipse users and adopters were looking forward to, but most important, has been coordinated with all other Eclipse projects of Galileo, and was ready for download at the scheduled.release date.

What future enhancements are you planning for your project?

The forthcoming releases of Riena are going to focus on a higher flexibility and on additional advancements of the proven UI-concept. These will include additional UI-features like full keyboard control over all UI elements, a number of improvements for detached view as well as a support of custom UI-components in the navigation like “calendar” and others. Furthermore the Remote Service capabilities of Riena will be expanded by adding data compression, server ticks, push notification and a major performance improvement for processing large result sets.

That ends my series of new projects in Galileo.  I didn’t have a chance to catch up with the leaders of Mobile Tools for Java (MTJ) and the Memory Analyzer project.  Both projects are growing great communities of users and adopters.  You should check them out.

Related

Project #7: Swordfish

Project #6: ACTF

Project #5: EclipseLink

Project #4: JWT

Project #3: TmL

Project #2: PDT

Project #1: Xtext

Eclipse Freshman Project #7: Swordfish

Project #7 is my ongoing series of new projects on the release train is Swordfish.   Oliver Wolf is the project leader of Swordfish and he was kind enough to participate in the series.

What does your project do?

The goal of the Swordfish project is to provide an extensible SOA framework based on the proven Eclipse Equinox runtime technology. The framework is designed to be complemented by additional open source components such as a service registry, a messaging system, a process engine etc. to form a comprehensive open source SOA runtime environment based on both established and emerging open standards.


Who are your typical users?

We currently address two types of users. First of all, application developers seeking a more modular and reusable alternative to classical client/server architectures will probably find the SOA approach beneficial and can use the tools that come with Swordfish to easily create their own service implementations. Secondly, since Swordfish is an extensible framework, users who require a customized SOA runtime solution can extend the framework with plugins for different aspect such as configuration, policy-based message processing etc.

Why did you join the Galileo release train? After completing your first release train, what do you think now?

Swordfish joined the Galileo release train to improve its visibility in the Eclipse ecosystem and help grow the community. Being part of the simultaneous release reduces the entrance barrier for developers new to SOA and hopefully gives us the feedback we need to make the further development of Swordfish really community driven.

The last few months have been a great learning experience for us (although painful at times). The effort involved in participating in such a large coordinated release is not to be underestimated, but we believe that the progress we made in setting up our build and release procedures was worth every minute spent.

Now we feel even more involved in the Eclipse community as a whole and are looking forward to the next challenges ahead!

What future enhancements are you planning for your project?

We plan to complement the Swordfish nucleus with other things such as a registry/repository, more advanced monitoring capabilities, deployment etc. to eventually result in a full-fledged open source SOA suite.

Related

Project #6: ACTF

Project #5: EclipseLink

Project #4: JWT

Project #3: TmL

Project #2: PDT

Project #1: Xtext

Winners of the Give a Tweet Contest

It has been a busy morning today on twitter.  Lots of people tweeting about Galileo and less important things like Meagan Fox and Transformers (people it is just a hollywood movie, Galileo is real 🙂 )

To follow-up on the Give a Tweet about Galileo contest, I am pleased to announce the 10 winners and 1 grand prize winner.  Each winner will receive an Eclipse shirt and the grand prize winner gets a conference pass to ESE 2009 or EclipseCon 2010.

The winner are:

chrishantha

corvidae

cschuyle

docfx

ekkescorner

jjurkiewicz

jwbito

vOllpfOsten

yojibee

fosslc

The grand prize winner, using the very nice Galileo avatar is chrishanta.  Chris I hope you can join us at ESE 2009 or EclipseCon 2010.  You at least can get a free pass.

Thanks to everyone that participated.  Keep chatting about Galileo on twitter.  btw, if you still want to win free Eclipse SWAG, how about write a blog about your views of Galileo?

Winners can contact Lynn Gayowski to collect their prize

Eclipse Freshman Project #6: Accessibility Tools Framework (ACTF)

Project #6 in my series of 10 new projects joining the Galileo release train is the Eclipse Accessibility Tools Framework (ACTF).   Kentarou Fukuda is a committer on ACTF.
What does your project do?

The Eclipse Accessibility Tools Framework (ACTF) project is working to provide an extensible and comprehensive framework for accessibility tools.

The ACTF 0.7 (Galileo release) provides an integrated development environment for accessible Web applications, going even beyond legislative compliance (as for U.S. Section 508) and also considering the special usability needs of everyone.  ACTF extends the Web, J2EE, and PHP Perspectives of Eclipse with seamless accessibility evaluation features, such as automatic error detection, visualization of usability for voice access users, and image-processing-based simulation of the views of low-vision people. These features help developers in quickly recognizing, learning about, and improving the accessibility of their applications.   This integration is just a first step. Our ultimate goal is to make every artifact generated with or developed on the Eclipse IDE accessible for everyone.

Who are your typical users?

Our current users are developers, designers, and accessibility testers who aim to create more accessible Web content.

Why did you join the Galileo release train? After completing your
first release train, what do you think now?

To join an annual release was one of our main objectives for the project. We want to contribute to Eclipse and to raise public awareness of the project. Honestly, it was a hard work. 🙂 By joining the release train, however, the quality and the maturity of ACTF were drastically improved.

It’s a good experience for us to work with such a large community. We’ll continue to enhance ACTF by leveraging this experience and we’ll join the next release train, too!


What future enhancements are you planning for your project?

The Eclipse ACTF team is planning to start community implementation of checking logic for new and coming accessibility guidelines, such as WCAG 2.0 and the new Section 508 revisions.  We are already working on several new features for visual complexity visualization and accessibility evaluation for mobile devices, which will expand the coverage of ACTF in the next release.  We also have plans to work with other Eclipse projects, such as WTP and PDT, to provide a more integrated accessibility improvement environment for Web developers.

Related

Project #5: EclipseLink

Project #4: JWT

Project #3: TmL

Project #2: PDT

Project #1: Xtext

Eclipse Freshman Project #5: EclipseLink

EclipseLink is project #5 in my series of projects new to the Galileo release train.   For those that might not know,  EclipseLink is based on the very popular TopLink product from Oracle.     Doug Clarke is the EclipseLink project lead.

What does your project do?

EclipseLink provides high performance runtime persistence support for Object-Relational (JPA), Object-XML Binding (JAXB), Service Data Objects (SDO), and Database Web Services (DBWS). These persistence services can be incorporated into Equinox OSGi, RCP, Java EE and Java SE applications.

Who are your typical users?

EclipseLink’s users span all application types, sizes and vertical markets. The contribution of Oracle TopLink’s source to initiate the EclipseLink project gives the EclipseLink community the benefit of a code base that has been used in production Java applications for over 12 years. If an application has persistence requirements, which almost all do, then EclipseLink should be used.

EclipseLink is available today within Oracle’s WebLogic Server and TopLink products, the GlassFish Application Server, and the Spring Framework. Our current install base is primarily Java EE and SE users but we’re seeing growing use of EclipseLink in Equinox/OSGi, RCP, and EMF applications.


Why did you join the Galileo release train? After completing your first release train, what do you think now?

The EclipseLink project joined the Galileo release train as part of a plan to become a key project in the Eclipse ecosystem and address persistence needs of users and other projects. Inclusion in the Galileo release makes EclipseLink available out of the box to all Equinox OSGi developers and to those who download the Eclipse IDE for Java EE developers or the Modeling Tools package. This increased distribution combined with efforts to integrate EclipseLink JPA with EMF in the Teneo project and WTP’s Dali Java Persistence Tools project will help grow our community.

Now that we are near completion of the Galileo release we have learned a lot about what is involved in coordinating such a large and diverse group of open source runtime and tools projects and have developed great respect for both the release train process and those who help keep the train on track for a predictable and high quality release each year. We are very excited about what we have accomplished for Galileo both within our project as well as within the consuming projects and packaging efforts. We look forward to continue growing our involvement in the Eclipse ecosystem and increasing our integration efforts with other projects requiring persistence capabilities or exposing tooling for users to develop their applications.


What future enhancements are you planning for your project?

The EclipseLink project continues to grow and the requests for enhancements continue to roll in. Addressing the needs of our community, expanding our integration capabilities, and continuing to lead persistence standardization activities are at the forefront of our planning. The most noteworthy deliverable in our near future is the Java Persistence 2.0 (JSR 317) reference implementation. Building on our past efforts delivering the Java Persistence 1.0 reference implementation with TopLink Essentials and our recent delivery of the SDO 2.1.1 reference implementation (JSR 235), EclipseLink’s JPA  2.0 implementation will be the first delivery from the Eclipse Foundation of a Java EE specification.

Related

Project #4: JWT

Project #3: TmL

Project #2: PDT

Project #1: Xtext

Galileo Freshman Project #4: Java Workflow Tooling (JWT)

Java Workflow Tooling (JWT),  is next up in my series on projects new to the Galileo release train.  Marc Dutoo is the project co-leader.

What does your project do?

Java Workflow Tooling brings open business process design and development to the Eclipse platform. Business Process Management (BPM) is at the crossroads of business, middleware and integration, so it really shouldn’t lock up the options of its actors. That’s why JWT-modeled processes can look the way the analyst wants, hold any implementation information the developer adds in, and be deployed to the runtime platform of choice.

This is possible thanks to a flexible framework allowing extensible views, model and transformations, that communities and vendors can build on. JWT comes with several built-in extensions like UML Activity Diagram or Event-driven Process Chains (EPC) views, BPMN interoperability, code generation (e.g. XPDL, or WSBPEL-code in the AgilPro integration, but also HTML documentation). There are actually already a few solutions that integrate JWT, such as the SOA-focused Scarbo of the OW2 consortium, or AgilPro in SourceForge.

Who are your typical users?

Business process analysts and developers in need of a truly open workflow platform, but also vendors and academics interested by the extensibility of its framework. And anyone who already has a task-oriented, workflow-like engine but is missing an editor, and is willing to write an export transformation in order to get one.


Why did you join the Galileo release train? After completing your first release train, what do you think now?

Being in the Galileo release train demostrates that JWT is a mature project that can be used and build on. It was not easy to fulfill all requirements for Galileo, but the attention it brings to JWT alone is worth it ! On the other side we believe that JWT provides features that are a valuable addition to Galileo. And looking back, getting into the release train was a unique opportunity to improve the general quality of the project and enhance its reactivity and agility, one step closer to graduation.

What future enhancements are you planning for your project?

In the next release we plan to improve runtime tooling, including process simulation within Eclipse, deployment, monitoring as well as support for JBoss jBPM, but also switch to a more powerful views mechanism supporting different layouts.

Related

Project #3: TmL

Project #2: PDT

Project #1: Xtext

Give a Tweet about the Galileo Release

The Galileo release is next Wednesday.   We want to encourage everyone to help promote the Galileo release.  Lots of people are already writing blogs about Galileo and we have over 500 people on the Galileo Birds Nest to promote Galileo on twitter.

However, next Wednesday we want everyone on twitter to help promote the Galileo release.  Therefore, we are organizing an informal contest;  meaning the opportunity for free Eclipse SWAG to those who tweet about Galileo.

Here is how it works.

1. Next Wednesday, when we officially release the Galileo packages I want people to tweet about their favourite Galileo feature  or simply the fact they are downloading Galileo.  Make sure you remember to use the #eclipse35 hashtag.  This will allow us to track the Galileo tweets on the Birds Nest.

2. Use the Galileo Birds Nest to give your twitter avatar a Galileo overlay.

3.  The first 100 people that tweet about Galileo, using the #eclipse35 hashtag, will be entered into a draw to win an Eclipse shirt.  We will draw 10 different names, so 10 shirts will be given away.

4. The ten winners will also be eligible for the grand prize of a free conference pass to Eclipse Summit Europe 2009 or EclipseCon 2010.  However, to win the grand prize the person must be using the Galileo avatar.   We will keep drawing from these 10 people until we have a winner.  If none of the 10 winners are using the Galileo avatar, we won’t be able to award the grand prize.

Looking forward to seeing all the tweets next week about Galileo.

Galileo Freshman Project #3: Tools for mobile Linux

Tools for mobile Linux (TmL) is project #3 in my series of projects new to the Galileo release train.  Eric Cloninger is the TmL project lead.

What does your project do?

The Tools for mobile Linux (TmL) project creates tools and frameworks for mobile application development.

Who are your typical users?

Our users are Eclipse developers who are building mobile toolsets as well as end-users who need a VNC client.

Why did you join the Galileo release train? After completing your first release train, what do you think now?

We joined the Galileo release train as part of our objectives for the project. We wish to grow our community and raise awareness of what we are doing. Being on the train has forced us to be thorough in our testing and getting all the common Eclipse properties correct. It’s been a good experience for us to be a part of such a large effort.

What future enhancements are you planning for your project?

We are looking to expand the scope of TmL to be less focused on Linux and more focused on general Mobile Development. This change in charter will take in some of the development efforts around Eclipse Pulsar and should make the project more attractive to other mobile OS and handset vendors.

Related

Project #2: PDT

Project #1: Xtext

Galileo Freshman Project #2: PDT

Next up in my series of projects new to the release train is PDT.  PDT isn’t really a new project but this is the first time it has joined the release train.  They have also created a new PHP package that is currently the second most popular RC4 package on the download site.  PHP developers seems to love PDT.

The project leader for PDT is Roy Ganor.

What does your project do?

Eclipse PHP Development Tools (PDT) provides a development environment, based on the Eclipse platform,  for developing PHP scripts. This project encompasses the required development components for developing PHP, and facilitate extensibility. Eclipse PDT has become the de-facto standard for PHP development these days.

Who are your typical users?

Web developers that adhere to today’s Web standards are probably the biggest audience for Eclipse PDT. Team leaders and product managers also find it useful for prototyping their next generation products using Eclipse and PHP.

Why did you join the Galileo release train? After completing your first release train, what do you think now?

The power of open source projects is exposed when they adhere to industry standards. This is exactly why Eclipse PDT has decided to join the Galileo release train, as it provides an accepted framework which enables projects to commit to a certain level of quality and maturity. In addition we see a great difference in the publicity and visibility of Eclipse PDT this time. I can’t wait for next release to come!

What future enhancements are you planning for your project?

The Eclipse PDT team should always strive for better quality and support standards, hence we are going to focus on stability and usability in the next maintenance versions. We also have plans to open up more and more extensions for PHP framework teams around the world to be able to leverage PDT as the target environment for their developers.

Related

Project #1: Xtext